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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 8:50 am
  

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“Now in 1969, 99.9 per cent of the accelerating accelerations of the physical environment changes effecting all humanities evolution are transpiring in the realms of the electromagnetic spectrum realities which are undetectable directly by the human senses. Because they are gestating invisibly it is approximately impossible for world society to comprehend that the changes in the next 35 years (2004)-ushering in the twenty-first century will be far greater than our century and one half since the first United States census. We are engulfed in the invisible tidal wave which, as it draws away, will leave humanity, if it survives, cast up upon an island of universal success uncomprehending how it has all happened.”

A little more Bucky!

His predictions on the world economy and energy are pretty interesting to review as well.

The life of a pack rat I suppose but it is odd I never lost this one along the road!


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 10, 2006 4:40 pm
  

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I picked up the October 2006 edition of Scientific American and right there on the cover it spoke of mass extinctions, potentially an end of days we all share. So I flipped it open and in big bold green letters it said IMPACT FROM THE DEEP (with some echo echo echo and reverb at the end like in those cheesy reggae beat songs for effect!). These guys discussed the Asteroid Striking the Earth (soon to be in a theatre near you) theory of mass extinction of dinosaurs (Gods teaser) and (all though they accepted it as a possibility in some of histories great mass extinctions) came up with the conclusion that there was room for other theories of the END OF DAYS (with echo echo echo and reverb). Following the historic trails of C13 enrichment of the atmosphere (meaning plants and animals are doing fine) it seems they postulate that a meteor impact would be a rather quick event (geologically speaking) with a fairly quick recovery of producers (plants and the like). There technique of comparing the relative amounts of C13 versus C12 demonstrates a number of these “killing periods” followed by rather quick rebounds. The big one ending the cretaceous period was more efficient in its END OF DAYS affect, than.say a meteor the size of the moon. They speculate on a series of events that led to the deoxygenation of the oceans coupled to a drop in oceanic pH followed by a sudden burst of hydrogen sulfide gas from the oceans that essentially chokes all life for an excessive period of geologic time. I don’t know if you recall but a few years back the news was filled with a tragic story about an anoxic lake in Cameroon I believe. This lake has the nasty habit of belching hydrogen sulfide and killing the local inhabitants and their animals and their crops for miles around. Anyways, back to the End of Days, now the author leaves us with a happy note, the atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are currently only about 385 ppm which is only about 1/3 of that present in the past periods when this mass extinction effect was triggered (the annual rate of carbon dioxide increase in the atmosphere is 2 going 3 ppm so there is some time although this assumes linearity in this increase both in production rate and ecological equilibria.

It is interesting, I mean you read these articles about increases in the ocean temperature and the decreases in coral and crustacean life which is leading to deoxygentation and changes in the equilibria of heat and carbon dioxide and in some cases in the zone of hydrogen sulfide stratification (well maybe you don’t but I read this stuff) in the ocean. It makes me recall the early days of my education in geomicrobiology when we used to go out to the banks of the Canadian river near Norman Oklahoma and friends of mine were measuring the relative rates of microbiological activity around a landfill near the river. I remember being amazed how the big red dirt bank facing the upstream flow (taking the force of the water right in the kisser) would have a thick layer of stinky black muck below the surface but the banks not taking the force of the stream (watching the water leave) had only a thin layer. If you stuck tubes into the ground and measured the gases emanating from these distinct points the first would be emitting carbon dioxide will the second had a mixture of carbon dioxide and methane. You see the force of the water hitting the bank would infiltrate it with dissolved sulfate that would be reduced to sulfide and at the typical pH of the runoff this would be captured usually as iron sulfide (black stinky muck). Of course being near the land fill those reducing equivalents (mans waste) would be feeding the reduction process (it’s a good place for black muck development). If you ever look at the surface of that black stinky muck that is exposed to the son some tomes you can see purple life forms, that is purple sulfur photosynthetic bacteria that use the suns light to oxidize the hydrogen sulfide (similar to green forms that oxidize water to reducing equivalents and oxygen in a process called photosynthesis). Sometimes you see those smelly anoxic lagoons (cesspools) that are covered with yellow and purple when exposed to the sun (again sulfur photosynthetics making sulfur (the yellow bits) as an end product.

I am just rattling on and on but the point is “when God makes a mistake they call it Nature!”


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 7:19 am
  

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Last night I dreamed of that movie Little Big Man. That is a great movie. I might have made this scene up in my head but I was thinking of the part where Jack is entering his first “human being” camp with Grandfather and describes it something like “At first site of an Indian camp you would think you were going to their dump.” I think he lifted that line from a Lewis and Clark journal but it is still a good one. When you think about the ecology of the plains Indian in their state of nature they did little to their environment and the relative amount of waste and the nature of the waste was reabsorbed (of course it was all from renewable sources so it was a net balance). It was funny though that after writing all that stuff about Hydrogen Sulfide belching oceans and lakes and things I got my info letter from the Department of Botany and Microbiology from OU (Boomer Sooner, bad day in Dallas last Saturday). A buddy of mine who is tenured there wrote of his recent research (in conjunction with the Pokes up in Stillwater). The money is going to OSU via the USDA in the investigation of biomass energy crops (somewhere we talked of the economics of corn to ethanol). Anyway they are focusing on switchgrass gasification. Now, not knowing much about switchgrass, I would assume it is a grass that yields a high content of cellulose but is low in lignin, the stuff that gives plants rigidity (so microbes can handle it pretty readily). My buddy Ralph is working on more efficient fermentations that result in higher faster yields through bacterial fermentations versus yeast fermentations (the traditional beer route using corn). Ralph is always good for a sound bite and the one in this little news letter is “if you can burn it, we can ferment it” where he is talking of fermenting gases (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) that are usually released during this type of bacterial fermentation (as opposed to yeast) in the name of growth rate (pushing things away from equilibrium is typically not very energy efficient). The interesting thing is that money only goes into this type of research when the cost of oil goes up. These are things we talked of in the late seventies early eighties the last time the price of oil went up. It is not a new idea it is just that grant money is becoming available. I mean his source for the organisms is the OU Duck Pond, where many a young lover over the years has lost control in ways that would repulse Dr. Kennedy but you know how it is when you are young and it is a nice spring day!

They have also hired a new environmental microbiologist from Michigan State (a huge Microbial Ecology school if you didn’t know) who if interested at life on the oxygen/no oxygen border in our biosphere here on Spaceship Earth (which directly links to the hydrogen sulfide discussion). Funny that I walked to the mail box and found this after writing yesterday.

Speaking of Dr. Kennedy and his Founding Fathers Argument to down play the Separation of Church and State (and therefore his anti ACLU campaign and his call to elect religious zealots to Congress), well, he is full of shit!. I mean, the guy uses as his foundation Thomas Jefferson and how his letter to some Baptist congregation in Danville was concerned about being railroaded into a state Religion and also he speaks of how the ACLU has removed any mention of religion from the textbooks making the Pilgrims a non religious group of adventurers. Does anybody believe this bullshit!! (The problem is yes). Thomas Jefferson, based on all the reading I am familiar with, was a proto Unitarian (the group that gave rise to the ACLU and also had among its membership one R Buckminster Fuller). The little Church in Danville was concerned that Congress would not maintain the separation of church and state because just like the (Puritan Fundamentalist Christian Witch-hunting Pilgrims) they feared the type of State religion sponsored persecution that had prompted recent revolutions fueled by the enlightenment of Hume and Voltaire. (Dr Kennedy has taken to snipping the bits of history that prove his points out of the grand fabric of time).

I was just thinking of one of the Botany people from OU (looking at the news letter, ya she is still there). She used to go to the Wichita Mountains wildlife refuge (a great and mystical place of the Commanche and Kiowa tribes back in the 1830’s when George Catlin traveled there to paint them) and she used to collect soil that had recently recieved buffalo urine from the source to determine the effect of this substance on grassland ecology. She used tell a hilarious tale of being tree-ed by a bull one day who didn’t care for the removal of his territory marker. Sometime I will have to tell the story of Uncle Andrew Martinez, who was purchased by the Kiowa from a band of Apache in about 1864 and became the adopted son of the great Kiowa chief Ten Bears and went on to be a practitioner of Kiowa medicine. He eventually married my Grandfathers aunt out in western Oklahoma near the town of Gotebo. I dusty road stop town named for a Kiowa chief they say that (when I was a youngster buck roaming that country) had one modern building, a renovated railroad car that served as the town diner and if you were there at the right time of day the coffee inside was bubbling hot and you could get the scoop on recent births, deaths and acts of stupidity or depravity that had occurred in the local vicinity in the last week or so!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 5:34 pm
  

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i think you have taunted us before with the mentioning of this uncle martinez story...i suppose the time will be right for that sometime...

little big man is a great movie, haven't seen it in a long time but a few lines always come to mind when i think of it.
"i've never been invisible before!" and
"i shall avert my eyes at the necessary moment"

and the phrase, "they don't know where the center of the earth is"

but oh yeah...i meant to post this earlier but have been a little indisposed. (......)
i wondered about this..

PSBeaty wrote:
the only reason we live through the stupid bad stuff now is because we choose to!!


what do you mean? (i suppose i better hold onto my hat)


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2006 8:17 pm
  

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THe invisible line is particularly interesting because the place depicted in the movie is the Washita River in western Oklahoma about 45 miles north of Gotebo and about 20 miles downstream of where my Grandfather (Uncle Andrew's Nephew and the the grandfather mentioned in my first post ever on Arlonet about Okemah) was born. The family had migrated to that part of the world because Pop's brother Tom (20 years old at the time of Pops birth in 1901) had been diagnosed with consumption and the treatment then was move to a drier climate (Tom lived to be 95 and buried 5 or 6 wives (and chased a few away) before death found him in Blanchard Oklahoma). Any ways, that line about Grandfather being invisible as depicted represents an event that occurred near what is now Cheyenne Oklahoma on the Washita River (Pop always said that river was more crooked than a bucket full of guts) when Colonel Custer (no longer a General after the War Between the States) on the orders of Phil Sheridan on the order of William Tecumsah Sherman who had started his march to the sea in Conyers Georgia (Pop's Fathers and my Great grandfathers home (he was 5 at the time) right through the front front yard and that is why we eat black eyed peas on New Years (cause that is the only thing the damn Yankees would not eat, hell they wouldn't even feed them to their horses) Oh ya Custer, that is where (the Washita) Custer attacked his first Indian village, the village of Black Kettle, the most peaceful accomodating and "unitarian" of the Cheyenne chiefs. This was the second time his village was attacked, the first being at Sand Creek Colorado almost exactly 4 years to the day before where the Colorado militia had cut the (this is disgusting) the genital lips from the dead squaws, stretched and dried them for hat bands (the small protuberance being the center piece in the front of the brim). Anyhow, this is where Grandfather was invisible while the band played Gary Owen, and in a infamous moment one of the squaws gutted a small child on the river bank (according to Custer and his men a white hostage), as Custer slaughtered two hundred mostly women and children in the Battle of the Washita (Wash It Taw). In dances with wolves when Kevin Costner enters the Indian camp for the first time they all start yelling Wash Sheet a Washeeta but it is Wash it taw. When I was a little kid (6 or 7) I remember roaming across this spot and feeling the most eerie feeling looking off at the antelope hills (the direction Custer came from). They always say Custer expected what happened at the Washita when he road into the Little Big Horn valley eight years later. Anyways, uncle Andrew Martinez was living in the Kiowa camp of Ten Bears at the time and his writings recall entering the camp of Black Kettle after Custer left and finding the torsos of the men, women and children in disgusting sexually suggestive poses (Abu Graib in 1868). I have a picture of this place on my wall at work and when anybody asks about Oklahoma (I am infamous as an Okie at work) I point to the picture and descirbe what happened there.

Oh Ya, if this is not a description of stupid needless occurences, I don't know what is!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 5:31 am
  

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http://www.amazon.com/Andele-Mexican-Ki ... F8&s=books

hey agnes, my uncle Andrew Martinez in his own words. there is a reviewer here who says Andrew (aka Andres aka Andele) was married to his great great aunt. THat would be a McWhorter as that was the maiden name of my great grandmother. That must be my second second cousin. Its a small world after all.

some times i ramble on and on
and i repeat myself till all my friends are gone
get lost in snow, drown in rain
and never feel the same again

look Neil Young words.

And, if you haven't looked at the headlines this morning the world still sucks!


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:03 pm
  

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psb... :)


referring to your previous post, that does look like some unnecessary bad stuff that some people chose to do to some other people who didn't choose to have it done to them

anyway, i'm glad you're here...call me crazy


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:13 pm
  

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your crazy


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:39 pm
  

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well look who's talkin'


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2006 9:55 pm
  

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I was reading Black Elk (suddenly I have pulled all my old native american books) and noticed he referred to whites by a Lakota term Washichu. Well this is probably what was used in the dances with wolves movie since that was a story that takes place on the northern plains in Soiux territory (and probably before the Washita incident). On the southern plains troopers were known as Washita for what they did there that day (from some accounts anyway). That is why I mentioned it above but as they say "I was wrong and I stand corrected." Washichu means "he who steals the fat" or "greedy" or "whiteman".

Just a clarification.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:24 am
  

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http://bioenergy.ornl.gov/papers/misc/switgrs.html

Just because!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:31 pm
  

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I was thinking of something cool to write and stuff, but then what the F', nobody gives a damn. If I vote Democratic that will show at least tokin something???? But it is just a game anyway, nobody gives a damn about the truth!
Oh Know, he is in that mood again!!!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:33 pm
  

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Have another drink it'll make you feel better
have another drink and you'll feel alright
if your feeling down and your under the weather
have another drink and you'll feel alright, alright!


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 8:36 pm
  

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hey! i was just gettin ready to write this (word for word) not that i know a lot...

about the article:

sounds good so far!

good stuff to know, thanks for posting it!


Last edited by agnes on Fri Oct 13, 2006 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 13, 2006 9:04 pm
  

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and i meant it


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